Saturday, March 10, 2007

New comics -- lots of 'em -- 2/28/07 and 3/7/07

Grab a snack -- this could take a while.

Wednesday was not only the day of "LA LA LA I HAVEN'T READ CAP #25 YET," it was capped off (sorry) with a massive stack of 18 floppies, to go with the 7 issues I haven't gotten to from last week. (Three of yesterday's buys were delayed from last week, so that contributed.) I like comics a whole lot, but I can't take too many more Wednesdays like that.

2/27/07

The last week of February featured two themes, with the first being the New Gods. Hawkgirl #61 (written by Walt Simonson, drawn by Renato Arlem) picks up with the Apokoliptian gizmo (actually, a "gizmoid") that found its way to the St. Roch museum last issue. This time it's attracted the attention of the Female Furies. The Furies fight Hawkgirl for it, but it has ideas of its own and ... I'm not quite sure what happens, but a robot Hawkgirl wings away from a pile of unconscious superwomen, including Kendra. In subplot news, there's the usual workplace banter, and Hawkgirl gets a new set of shootin' irons (which don't do her much good, because: robot.) I'm not quite sure how to feel about this series, because on the one hand, I really liked Simonson's work on the Fourth World in Orion, but it was full of grandeur and pomp, and this is more irreverent. It's nicely done, but still. Also, this looks like a more sexx-ay version of the Female Furies than I'm used to, and it kind of reduces their appeal somewhat. I'm not saying that ugly = evil by any means, but the old-style Furies looked terrifying, and that was the point. These new ones ... eh. Arlem's art is fine, except for the ending, where first it's not clear how Robot Hawkgirl comes out of Human Hawkgirl (and that may be intentional) and then it's not clear whether Robot Hawkgirl is supposed to be human-sized or gigantic. (Maybe a callback to 52?)

Darkseid's uncle Steppenwolf fights Bart in Flash: The Fastest Man Alive #9 (written by Marc Guggenheim, pencilled by Ron Adrian, inked by Art Thibert), and that's pretty exclting, if a little generic, but most of the issue is concerned with Marc Guggenheim genuflecting towards the fans and basically trying to make his script as charming as possible. Combined with Adrian and Thibert's simple, straightforward art -- a lot less busy than Ken Lashley, but not as good as the Karl Kerschl fill-in from a few issues back -- the issue works pretty well. I'm still not convinced that DC needed to replace Wally with Bart, but this issue makes Bart a lot less unappealing than he was last time.

Because last week was also apparently Dan Jurgens Week, he provides the layouts for Firestorm #33 (written by Dwayne McDuffie, pencilled by Ken Lashley, inked by Rob Stull). As you might guess from the cover, most of the issue is a fight involving Orion, Firestorm, Mr. Miracle, and the Female Furies. I should point out that this is the Seven Soldiers Mr. Miracle, but the traditional versions of Orion and the Furies, and yes, the Furies look a lot scarier here. McDuffie writes some very witty banter between Shilo and Firestorm, and gives each his own clever introductory sequence. The Firestorm/Orion fight is also entertaining. Art is a little more severe than it has been, with the combination of Jurgens/Lashley/Stull being reminiscent of '80s Firestorm artist Tom Grindberg -- lots of slashy lines and "shiny" inks. Still, Jurgens is a good storyteller, so that helps. All in all a good issue, and a nice way to start the series' final arc.

Jurgens also lays out 52 #43 (written by JMRW, breakdowns by Keith Giffen, finishes by Norm Rapmund), the first part of the two-week How Tragic, Black Adam's Evil Again arc. Also, Buddy Baker finds out he can mimic Sun-Eaters, which apparently doesn't come with their craving for, you know, suns. More on Black Adam later.

Jurgens does most of the work in JLA Classified #35 (co-written by Dan Slott, inked by Al Milgrom), the part of the Red King's plan that works out the best for him. This means, to quote Dave Campbell, it's an Alternate Universe Where Everyone Dies. It doesn't seem necessary to show the grisly deaths of the Justice League, so I'm giving this particular issue a thumbs-down, but maybe the conclusion will justify its existence.

In non-Dan Jurgens, non-New Gods comics, Hal defeats Amon Sur and the Sinestro Corps makes its triumphant appearance in Green Lantern #17 (written by Geoff Johns, pencilled by Ivan Reis, inked by Oclair Albert). It got me thinking, though: Amon did have a point about Hal just burying Abin Sur under a mountain. Hal doesn't have the best reputation for tactfulness, so now maybe he can start atoning for his past misdeeds? "My Name Is Hal," coming soon....

Also, the Batman scene was pretty funny.

I liked Action Comics #846 (written by Johns and Richard Donner, drawn by Adam Kubert) because it aimed only to show the Phantom Zone villains' devastating first strike at Superman. It left me wanting to see the next issue, which is job one for any serial installment. I'm still not sold on the arc as a whole, but this issue was pretty good.

We close out February with Hero Squared #5 (breakdowns by Keith Giffen, script by J.M. DeMatteis, drawn by Joe Abraham), in which Captain Valor and Milo swap personalities, so to speak -- Milo explores his inner hero, and Valor continues to mope. Milo has a funny scene with Caliginous too. I continue to like this series, but I get the feeling we've been going over this ground for a few issues now, and five issues in, it's time to find the plot and stick with it.

3/7/07

Okay, here we go. I'm just going to try and knock these out.

52 #44: I know a few other bloggers have said it, but 52 doesn't do action well. It can make the case for a couple of weeks of all-action issues like #43 and #44, but it works best portraying slice-of-life snippets, because the action stuff makes you ask, "is this the most important thing that happened this week?" I don't think we needed to go into detail about something that has been foreshadowed pretty heavily ever since Isis was introduced, especially because her last bit of advice seems to contradict a lot of what she's espoused previously. Also, I wasn't too fond of the fight storytelling, not least because the Four Horsemen have a lot of parts that aren't easily recognizable, such that seeing only parts of them makes it hard for me to orient myself within the panel.

(The All New) Atom #9: Ryan Choi goes back home for "Sometimes They Come Back." It's pretty familiar: undead bullies are just as intimidating as regular bullies, yadda yadda yadda. The revelations about his old girlfriend are interesting, but we'll see next issue if they lead to anything more. This title seems to work better with the more science-y stuff.

The Authority #2: Now that the story of Ken, The Earth-Prime Submariner has given way to a more conventional superhero comic, our main cast has to adjust to life on Earth-Prime. I don't know if I'm on this book for the long haul -- I'm not that invested in the Authority, and this was a pretty unremarkable issue. Next issue might be fun, but who knows when that will be?

Batman Confidential #3: Still not making much of an impression.

Detective Comics #829: I'm resisting the Die Hard jokes (Die Battier? ... no) because this looks like a good fill-in from writer Stuart Moore. Bruce Wayne is trapped in Wayne Tower with dignitaries, and Robin has to do the costumed work. Andy Clarke's art is fine, although occasionally Bruce looks kind of doughy.

Justice League of America #6: The end of the Red Tornado story (I thought it had one more issue to go) isn't so bad in terms of efficiency, but it does confirm that this is a Red Tornado story and not so much a Justice League story. Also, reader discretion is advised for scenes of extreme dismemberment. Not to mention just talking about dismemberment: I echo the blogger who wondered, do they practice sawing off Amazo's legs? (Do they use Buster the dummy?)

Manhunter #29: I'm pretty new to the series, but it seems like Kate doesn't get in the costume a whole lot. When she does at the end of this issue, it's pretty cool. This arc has been about the Special Guest Stars, though, with subplots about other D-list characters (Cameron Chase, Mark Shaw, Azrael; not that they're not cool), so I guess I shouldn't be surprised. It feels like DC's She-Hulk, and that ain't bad.

Nightwing #130: Marv, you're starting to lose me. I kind-of understand the Bride and Groom relationship. However, maybe I'm not paying enough attention, but I don't quite understand how their victims are important to Nightwing. I did like the setpiece on the ferry, though.

Shazam! The Monster Society Of Evil #2: What a fun book this has turned out to be, and what a clever homage it presents to the original Mr. Mind story. If memory serves, he wasn't seen fully until well into the storyline, so assuming Jeff Smith sticks to that, his "big reveal" (so to speak) here should be pretty fun. Also, DC Direct, please make a Mary Marvel plush toy for me to give to my 4-year-old niece.

Supergirl and the Legion #27: The Ranzz brothers make up as Cosmic Boy and Brainiac 5 have an accident with their dimension doors. Basically, a lot goes wrong for the Legion this issue, and only a Dave Cockrum tribute can save them.

Superman/Batman #32: I think the best thing about this issue is the scary Batman it presents towards the end. Oh, and the obscure DC alien heroes (the Vanguard? Seriously?) that make cameos. Otherwise, I'm about done with this series.

Welcome To Tranquility #4: A decent issue, but I want to read 'em all to make sure I have everything straight.

Captain America #25: This would have worked a lot better without all the hype. As a Big Death Issue, it's hardly suspenseful. For one thing, there's no body (promises of an upcoming autopsy notwithstanding -- and why do you need an autopsy if it's pretty obvious how he died?). For another, the death is, as the Klingons say, without honor: he gets shot on the courthouse steps while unmasked and handcuffed. Superman died delivering a mortal blow to a monster on the front porch of the Daily Planet. I'm just saying, if you give that to the New York Times, it seems more permanent. That said, as Part 1 of a new Cap story, and as someone's introduction to the idea of Captain America, it's a good gateway book.

Criminal #5: I understand why this story had to end the way it did, and I appreciate a format that lets a story end this way, and it's all executed (ahem) very professionally, but right now it doesn't sit well. I'll have to read this one again too.

Planetary Brigade: Origins #2: The PB cartoon gives a couple of members a chance to reflect on the team's history, and it occurs to me that maybe I'm getting a little burned out on the Giffen/DeMatteis schtick-for-its-own-sake. It's still witty, but between this and Hero Squared, it's just kind of there.

Marvel 1602: Fantastic Four #5, Fantastic Four #543, Fantastic Four: The End #6: The 1602 miniseries ended in a flourish of cataclysm and incomprehensibility, the Alan Davis miniseries ended rather predictably (for all those who thought that we weren't done with the tragic events of #1), and the anniversary issue was good for its second and third stories. I like Mike McKone, but he's not the right artist for the book, and the bridge from Reed & Sue to T'Challa and Ororo is a rickety one.

2 comments:

Charlie Anders said...

I agree about Hero Squared. It has *so* much potential and I keep waiting for it to start soaring. Giffen & Dematteis are capable of so much more than just "schtick," as witness their Guy & Tora in Hell storyline. But it feels as though Hero Squared has been going in circles... and now it's ending. Bah.

Tom Bondurant said...

I've been watching "Greatest American Hero" DVDs and wondering why nobody thought to snap up the comics license -- and now it strikes me, how great would Giffen & DeMatteis be on a GAH comic? (I know there was Truth, Justin & The American Way, but I read a preview online and it didn't quite impress me.)

Maybe it wouldn't be a license to print money, but heck, I'd buy it.